Heat, Drought & Wildfire

  • EXTREME HEAT


    HOT WEATHER

    results in hundreds of fatalities each year

  • ELDERLY & CHILDREN


    MOST LIKELY

    to suffer when the temperature rises

  • DROUGHTS


    WILDFIRES

    can also be the result of super-hot temperatures

  • SWEAT


    MEN

    sweat more, making them susceptible to heat illness but anyone at any age can be affected by heat stress

HEAT-RELATED ILLNESSES

High temperatures, like the kind we experience in the North Texas Region in the summer, along with high humidity, can cause heat-related illnesses which range in severity from mild heat cramps, to heat exhaustion, to potentially life-threatening heatstroke.


 

IllnessDescriptionSigns & SymptomsSafety Tips
Heat Cramps
  • Painful, involuntary muscles spasms. They may occur during heavy exercise and are often caused by dehydration.
  • Spasms that feel like nighttime leg cramps, only more severe. They often occur in the abdomen and back.
  • Cool down and rest.
  • Drink an electrolyte-containing sports drink or clear juice
  • Gently stretch and massage the affected muscles
  • Call your doctor if your cramps don’t go away in one hour
Heat Exhaustion
  • Exhaustion that begins suddenly and is sometimes caused by heavy exercise, sweating and dehydration.
  • Low blood pressure
  • Cool, moist skin
  • Low-grade fever
  • Feeling faint
  • Nausea
  • Heavy sweating
  • Rapid, weak heartbeat
  • Move the person to a shady area
  • Lay them down and keep their legs and feet slightly elevated
  • Loosen or remove their clothing
  • Give them cool water (not iced) or a sports drink containing electrolytes to drink
  • Fan the person and spray or sponge them down with cool water
  • Remember: Heat exhaustion can quickly turn into heat stroke. If fever greater than 102˚F, fainting, confusion or seizures occur, dial 9-1-1
Heatstroke
  • A potentially life-threatening, heat-related problem that often results from heavy work and dehydration. The body’s normal mechanisms for dealing with heat stress, such as sweating and temperature control, stop working. Older adults, people who are obese and people born with a physical disability are at greatest risk.
  • Body temperature, generally greater than 104˚F, with changes in mental status like confusion and even coma
  • Skin may be hot and dry, although in heat strokes caused by exertion, the skin is usually moist
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rapid and shallow breathing
  • Elevated or lowered blood pressure
  • Sweating stops
  • Irritability, confusion or unconsciousness
  • Fainting, which may be the first sign in older adults
  • Move the person into the shade or air-conditioned space
  • Dial 9-1-1
  • Wrap the person with damp sheets or spray them with cool water

SAFETY TIPS

When you are at home

  • Caution


    Avoid
    The Sun

    Stay out of the sun as much as possible and use sunscreen (SPF 25 or higher).

  • HYDRATE


    Drink
    Water

    Stay Hydrated. Drink plenty of non-alcoholic and caffeine-free fluids

  • Prepare


    Check
    Your A/C

    Install window air-conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary. Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.

  • Seal


    Save
    Money

    Weather-strip doors and window sills to keep cool air in.

Drought Information

Get up-to-date drought information for North Texas Region

Drought Impact Reporter

SAFETY TIPS

WHEN YOU ARE OUTSIDE

  • Water


    BE
    MINDFUL

    Help prevent drought by watering your lawn only when necessary and adhering to local weather restrictions.

  • SAFETY


    NO
    BURN

    Help prevent wildfires by respecting “no burn” days.

  • TOBACCO


    PROPERLY
    DISPOSE

    Avoid roadside fires by disposing of cigarettes responsibly.

  • Charcoal


    HOSE
    DOWN

    Dispose of hot charcoal in a non-flammable container or hose down before discarding

Take the Quiz

  • Question 1

    In addition to high temperatures, what is a factor that causes heat related illness?

    Correct!

    It's not the heat, it's the humidity

    Incorrect

    Humidity can sap your strength

  • Question 2

    You can help prevent drought by watering your lawn only when necessary and adhering to local weather restrictions.

    Correct!

    Overusing water during a shortage can cause an even greater shortage

    Incorrect

    Overusing water during a shortage can cause an even greater shortage

  • Your Results

    0 Correct, 0 Wrong

  • Make a Plan

    A little preparation could protect your life and the lives of those around you. It only takes a few minutes to develop a plan. When finished, you'll have a pocket-size emergency plan at hand.

  • Build a Kit

    Remember how long it took to pack for your last vacation? The last thing you want to worry about in a disaster is packing. That’s why everyone should have an Emergency Supply Kit ready to go. Use this checklist to help you assemble your kit.

/// September is National Preparedness Month ///